Art students heading to Maine, South Dakota for summer workshops

Release Date: 5/23/2013

Two University of the Ozarks art students have received special funding to attend summer workshops in order to gain valuable professional experience.

Abigail Kern

Ozarks junior art major Abigail Kern will take part in a ceramics program in Newcastle, Maine.

Abigail Kern, a junior art major from Wichita, Kan., specializes in ceramics and will attend the Watershed Center for the Ceramics Arts in Newcastle, Maine. The program will allow her to develop her own artistry while making valuable connections within the art community.

According to Ozarks Associate Professor of Art Tammy Harrington, the Watershed Center offers a unique summer experience for serious art students.

"The program invites artists to work alongside each other, rather than having a teaching set-up," Harrington explained. "Each session has a core group of artists working on a theme, and then others are invited to apply and work on that same theme as well.  The theme of the session Abigail is attending is 'Narrative through Clay.' "

Kern received funding to attend the workshop from the Academic Enrichment Fund, a competitive university award established to help qualified Ozarks students fund enriching educational opportunities.

Also attending a professional art workshop this summer is sophomore art and business major Chelsey Becker from Claremore, Okla.

Chelsey Becker

Chelsey Becker, a sophomore art and business major, will take part in Frogman's Print and Paper Workshop over the summer.

Becker, with funding help from Ozarks' Business program, will participate in Frogman's Print and Paper Workshop, an intense week-long printmaking workshop at University of South Dakota.

During her time in South Dakota, Becker will participate in specialized printmaking courses learning new techniques while studying traditional forms of printmaking as well.

"Chelsey will be participating in the Japanese Woodblock Printmaking workshop, examining the techniques and history of traditional Japanese woodblock printmaking and its use as a contemporary printmaking medium," Harrington explained.