Business executive gives career advice to Ozarks students.

Release Date: 1/26/2006

Speaker urges continual awareness of ethical issues in the workplace.

CLARKSVILLE, ARK. (Jan. 26, 2006) – A veteran business executive called on Ozarks students to keep up with the world around them so that they might hit the ground running after they graduate and start their first jobs.

Drawing on his nearly 30 years in business, including several high-level positions with Dow Jones & Co., Inc., Frank C. “Kim” Breese III challenged students to search out news stories of ethical issues faced by companies in order to help prepare themselves for the world of work they will soon enter.

“These are things you’ll have to deal with,” said Breese, citing recent examples including sexism in the workplace, potentially unhealthy products and criticism of advertising that targets children, as well as more serious transgressions that have resulted in criminal penalties for some companies.

Breese spoke to a packed classroom of students as part of Ozarks’ distinguished speaker series, sponsored by the campus chapters of Phi Beta Lambda (Future Business Leaders) and Students in Free Enterprise.

After growing up in Monroe, La. and earning a law degree, Breese held a variety of management positions with Dow Jones, including national production manager, vice president of operating services and chief administrative officer. He also served as president and CEO of Newsprint South, a newsprint manufacturing company in Mississippi, before retiring in 1999 to practice law in Jackson, Miss.

Students quizzed Breese on the ins and outs of the workplace, asking about everything from preparation for a job interview to finding a balanced life while working full-time.

Breese said students must decide for themselves what constitutes success, and then work tirelessly to achieve that goal.

He also urged students to “Make a plan for your life,” but added that “You’ll probably have a lot of diversions along the way,” citing his own life as an example.

“I was going to practice law in a small town, but then I had the opportunity to work for a corporation, and I really liked it,” said Breese. “And now I’m a lawyer in a one-man law firm in a medium-sized town in Mississippi!”

Ozarks student Mark Hoenninger, set to graduate in May, said he was impressed and inspired by Breese’s words.

“I like his views (on work),” said Hoenninger. “He shows how to work for a corporation and still be truthful and honest and respectful.”